Tri-Cities

McCook

North Platte

Scottsbluff

Tri-Cities

Country 96 AM 1430 KRGI 97-3 The Wolf

McCook

Coyote Country 93.9 The Zone True Country 102.1

North Platte

Rock 100 Country 93.5 TBD

Scottsbluff

KMOR-FM Sunny 99.3 Wild Country 106.9

OCTOBER 25, 2018 (KEARNEY, NEB.)  — Investigators with the Nebraska State Patrol have arrested a man in connection with the death of an infant in Wilcox earlier this month.

Investigators initially responded to a report of the death of six-week-old Zackary Preston on October 1, 2018 when the infant was found unresponsive in a bed at his home in Wilcox.

Following an investigation, the child’s father, Christopher Preston, 23, of Wilcox, was arrested on charges of felony child abuse resulting in death. The arrest was made Wednesday, October 24, at his place of work in Holdrege.

Christopher Preston was lodged in Kearney County Jail.


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MARCH 19, 2019 (LINCOLN, NEB.)  — Troopers with the Nebraska State Patrol removed seven impaired drivers from the road during a drunk driving enforcement campaign on St. Patrick’s Day, Sunday, March 17.

“We have many troopers working diligently to perform rescues, manage closed roads, and respond to numerous situations in areas affected by this devastating flood,” said Colonel John Bolduc, Superintendent of the Nebraska State Patrol. “But in other parts of the state, troopers are patrolling the roads to keep Nebraskans safe as they travel.”

Troopers in areas not affected by the flooding were able to participate in the national St. Patrick’s Day drunk driving enforcement campaign. On Sunday, troopers arrested seven motorists for driving under the influence.

In addition to the arrests for drunk driving, troopers also issued citations for speeding (60), driving under suspension (7), open container (3), minor in possession (4), no proof of insurance (4), no seat belt (4), and improper child restraint (3).

Troopers around Nebraska also performed 59 motorist assists on Sunday for drivers in need of help. This enforcement was made possible thanks in part to a grant for $9,655 from the Nebraska Department of Transportation – Highway Safety Office.


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HASTINGS, Neb. (AP) —HASTINGS, Neb. (AP) — Authorities say a 78-year-old Hastings man died in a collision west of Hastings.

John "Jack" Osborne (OZ'-burn) was the younger brother of former Nebraska congressman and football coach Tom Osborne.

The Adams County Sheriff's Office says Jack Osborne was headed south on a county road Sunday around 7:50 p.m. when he didn't halt at a stop sign and collided with a westbound vehicle on U.S. Highway 6.

Authorities say the other driver, 19-year-old Dariana Burr, of Juniata, wasn't seriously injured.

John "Jack" Osborne (OZ'-burn) was the younger brother of former Nebraska congressman and football coach Tom Osborne.

The Adams County Sheriff's Office says Jack Osborne was headed south on a county road Sunday around 7:50 p.m. when he didn't halt at a stop sign and collided with a westbound vehicle on U.S. Highway 6.

Authorities say the other driver, 19-year-old Dariana Burr, of Juniata, wasn't seriously injured.


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THE OREGON TRAIL COMMUNITY FOUNDATION has awarded a grant to the Western Nebraska Bicycling Club for the installation of four

Bicycle Repair Stations in the community


Scottsbluff.Four bicycle repair stations like this one, with a work stand, bicycle repair tools, and an air pump, will be installed in Scottsbluff and Gering in spring 2019. Photo courtesy of Bike Fixation

Grant support enables purchase of public bicycle repair stations

Scottsbluff and Gering will have new bicycle repair resources available this spring, thanks to a collaborative community effort and the support of City of Gering Keno Funds and the Oregon Trail Community Foundation.


The Scottsbluff-Gering-Terrytown Active Living Advisory Committee, the Nebraska Bicycling Alliance, and the Western Nebraska Bicycling Club are working with community partners to install four bicycle repair stations in the community.


The stations will be located at Western Nebraska Community College, Sonny’s Bike Shop, and the Y in Scottsbluff, and at Summit Christian College in Gering, which are all accessible by bike path or Tri-City Roadrunner busses equipped with bicycle transport racks. Each bicycle repair station will include a work stand, a tethered set of bicycle repair tools, and an air pump.


After the stations are installed in the spring, Western Nebraska Bicycling Club members will host repair clinics to teach people how to use the stations to make basic bicycle repairs.

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ALAC member Katie Bradshaw said that the availability of bicycle repair tools and the repair clinics will help more people to get out and ride.


“There are bicycles stashed in garages that are not being ridden just because a small repair is needed,” Bradshaw said. “The bike repair stations and the repair clinics can help get those hibernating bikes rolling again, and provide people with another option for getting the physical activity they need to stay healthy.”


In addition to the grants from City of Gering Keno Funds and Oregon Trail Community Foundation, funding for the bicycle repair stations is coming from Western Nebraska Bicycling Club, Western Nebraska Community College, and Sonny’s Bike Shop. The Panhandle Public Health District and Nebraska Bicycling Alliance are providing administrative support.


-For more information about the bicycle repair stations, contact Bradshaw at 308-632-3607.


About the Oregon Trail Community Foundation


The Oregon Trail Community Foundation is dedicated to supporting projects that improve education, our schools, wildlife preservation, historical landmarks, the arts, healthcare and scientific research. The Foundation offers grants, scholarships and other services to organizations and individuals through funds provided by donations, memberships, bequests, trusts and other financial vehicles.  The Oregon Trail Community Foundation helps you contribute to the betterment of your community.


About the Tri-Cities Active Living Advisory Committee


The Tri-Cities Active Living Advisory Committee creates and improves communication links and resource sharing to support healthy and active behaviors and lifestyles. The Panhandle Public Health District facilitates this working group of committed people, including representatives from Gering, Scottsbluff, and Terrytown city governments; public health professionals; citizens; and social service agencies.


About the Nebraska Bicycling Alliance


The Nebraska Bicycling Alliance works to cultivate a safer, more bicycle friendly Nebraska through partnerships, education, and advocacy. Our vision is a Nebraska where bicycling is a safe and enjoyable part of the Good Life.



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North Platte, Ne - This morning (3/21/19) at 7:32am, North Platte officers responded to the 100 block of West Leota reference a reported death. The officer located the deceased male, who had been found on the ground in an enclosed area where the trash cans of a nearby business are stored (not IN the trash cans). The death is not considered suspicious and appears to be natural causes. The release of the male's name is pending notification of next of kin.  

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LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — Nebraska lawmakers are set to kick off a new session Wednesday with proposals to balance a tight state budget, lower property taxes and legalize medical marijuana in the face of a potential ballot measure.

The new, 90-day session will also usher in 13 new state senators who will reshape the officially nonpartisan Legislature in ways not yet known.

Here are some things to watch:

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THE BUDGET

A persistent state revenue shortfall could create budget headaches once again for lawmakers, who have relied on Nebraska's rainy-day fund the last several years.

Nebraska faces a projected $95.1 million revenue shortfall in its upcoming two-year, general fund budget.

It's a tiny fraction of the roughly $9 billion total state budget and smaller than other recent shortfalls, but some lawmakers worry the downturn will continue and they won't have enough money left in the rainy-day fund to cover state expenses. The fund holds about $296 million, down sharply from the $729 million stashed away in 2016.

"I think we may be getting to the point where we can't afford to use any more of that," said Speaker of the Legislature Jim Scheer, of Norfolk.

In an interview last week, Gov. Pete Ricketts said tapping the cash reserve was appropriate given the downturn in agriculture, the state's largest industry. Ricketts has previously said he'd like to keep about $500 million in the rainy-day fund.

"The reason you have a rainy-day fund is to help cushion against economic downtimes," he said. "In agriculture, it's clearly raining."

Lawmakers will also debate how to pay for a voter-approved measure to expand Medicaid to an estimated 90,000 low-income residents. Ricketts said he will fit that expense into his budget proposal to lawmakers, but it's likely to crowd out other priorities over time.

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PROPERTY TAXES

Lawmakers will try once again to address the complaints of farmers, ranchers and homeowners who have seen sharp increases in their local property tax bills.

The issue rises to the forefront nearly every year, but lawmakers seldom agree on how to pay for property tax cuts and who should receive most of the benefits.

"I'm relatively optimistic we can get something done this year," said Sen. Tom Briese, an Albion farmer who has introduced numerous property-tax proposals. "A lot more folks are realizing the gravity of the situation."

The biggest recipient of property tax dollars are K-12 public schools, particularly in rural districts that no longer qualify for state equalization aid because they contain too much valuable land. Farmers argue that they're paying higher property taxes even though lower commodity prices have reduced their incomes.

Sen. Patty Pansing Brooks, of Lincoln, said she understands the pressure farmers are facing and wants to help, but she also sees needs in her urban district.

"We have to work together," she said. "The conservative and rural members need to work with the urban senators and the progressives to really get something done."

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ELECTING NEW LEADERS, SETTING THE RULES... AND MORE GRIDLOCK?

Lawmakers will choose new committee leaders in a secret-ballot election that's often full of surprises.

During the last elections in 2017, conservative Republicans won nearly all of the Legislature's leadership positions and tried to force through a change that would have made it harder for Democrats to win committee chairmanships in the future. Democrats and even some moderate Republicans blasted the moves as a partisan power grab, and the dispute brought the Legislature to a virtual standstill for 30 days.

The leadership votes were highly unusual in an officially nonpartisan Legislature, where committees are traditionally led by a mix of Republicans and Democrats. The new session will mark the first time lawmakers have formally addressed those issues since 2017.

Pansing Brooks said she's hopeful lawmakers will try to build coalitions more than they have in previous years.

"The original my-way-or-the-highway approach doesn't work," she said. "People are starting to realize it takes coalitions, it takes people working together."

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MEDICAL MARIJUANA

Nebraska lawmakers could face more pressure to legalize medical marijuana in some form, thanks to a group of senators and activists who are promising to put the issue on the 2020 ballot if nothing passes this year.

A newly formed ballot committee, Nebraskans for Sensible Marijuana Laws, plans to launch a signature-gathering campaign, although organizers said they'd prefer that lawmakers address the issue. Sen. Anna Wishart, of Lincoln, a leading proponent, will introduce a medical marijuana bill this year.

Similar measures won approval last year in Missouri, Oklahoma and Utah, bringing the total to 33 states that have legalized the drug for medicinal purposes. Unlike past efforts in Nebraska that have faltered, the latest campaign is backed by the Marijuana Policy Project, a national group that has helped lead five successful marijuana-related ballot measures.


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SIDNEY, Neb. (AP) — A Canadian company has made a deal with Bass Pro Shops to buy one of Cabela's corporate buildings in Sidney — a deal that could provide 150 or more local jobs.

The sales price and other financial details about the MMP Enterprises purchase have not been released. MMP is a logistics management company based in Toronto.

Sidney economic development director Melissa Norgard says MMP wants to have the sale wrapped up within 90 days and begin hiring. Norgard also says the number of MMP jobs in Sidney could grow as the company develops the business model for its first expansion outside of Canada.

Cabela's employed more than 2,000 people at its sprawling Sidney headquarters before being purchased by rival Bass Pro Shops.


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Heartland United Way - Karen Rathke

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CDHD - Jodi Garretson

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Wendy Wells has dedicated her life to health care workforce development through early education. The University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing West Nebraska Division instructor and Chadron native, is considered a trusted resource and is a respected community partner and advocate.

 

For her efforts, Wells, recently received a Community Star award from the National Organization of State Offices of Rural Health (NOSORH). NOSORH assists State Offices of Rural Health in their efforts to improve access to, and the quality of, health care for more than 60 million rural Americans.

 

The award recognizes those who dedicate their life’s work to rural health and make a positive impact on rural lives.

 

“I am passionate about recruiting and retaining health care providers to rural areas, especially western Nebraska,” said Wells, who teaches population health and coordinates service learning for students. “To be recognized for my efforts by the National Organization of State Offices of Rural Health is a great honor.”

 

“Recipients are extraordinary people whose contributions are deserving of recognition,” said Teryl Eisinger, executive director of NOSORH. “Each is a shining example of their generosity, service, and dedication to the people who call rural America home.”

 

Wells, a graduate of Colorado State University in Fort Collins, returned to Scottsbluff after graduation where she pursued nursing degrees, including a master’s in community health nursing. She also is an education coordinator for the Nebraska Panhandle Area Health Education Center.

 

In the role, she teaches population health and coordinates service learning projects for area schools, such as arranging for nursing students to work with local health providers and resources, including student health and diabetic screenings, area soup kitchens, Habitat for Humanity, flu/immunization clinics, and even horse therapy, an increasingly popular activity.

 

Aside from her outstanding contributions, the nominator also indicated that Wells donates much of her time to advance the organization’s core and mission.

 

“Whether she’s organizing annual camps that focus on creating interest in nursing careers for high school students or pre-health professions for new college students, or at the head of the class providing didactic and experiential training, Wendy embodies the generosity and spirit of an extraordinary rural health nurse,” according to the nominator.

 

Wells is featured in a publication released on National Rural Health Day each year, which can be found at http://www.powerofrural.org/community-stars.

 

The National Organization of State Office of Rural Health is the membership association of the nation’s 50 State Offices of Rural Health. State Offices of Rural Health are anchors of information and support for rural communities, health professionals, hospitals and clinics across the nation. They are dedicated to collaboration, education, communication and innovation to improve health in small towns around the country.


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